• Nobles of Null is a forum based roleplay site where sci-fi and magic collide. Here, Earth remains fractured and divided despite humanity reaching out to the stars. Worse still, the trans-human slaves of one major power have escaped, only to establish their own Empire, seething with resentment at abuses of the past. Even the discovery of aliens, though medieval in development, has failed to rally these squabbling children of Earth together with its far darker implications. Worse still, is the discovery of the impossible - magic. Practiced by the alien locals, nearly depleted and therefore rare, its reality warping abilities remains abstract and distant to the general populace. All the while, unseen in the darkness of space, forces from without threaten to press in. For those with eyes opened by insight, it is clear that an era is about to end, and that a new age will dawn.

Heartstones

Ray of Meep

Administrator
Wiki Moderator
Report 23100815

Luna Institute of Technology
Cardiology Branch of the Medical Division

Dr. Ken Jackson


Abraham Gwan is an Arabian-Korean male, age 55, occupation spacecraft technician. On May 7th, 2310, he arrived on AU Luna after a two-month long voyage on the AUS Bradwell’s Dawn, which started from New Austin of the New Texas System. Details of the voyage can be found on the Dawn’s travel records, attached in Appendix A. Mr. Gwan participated in a full body scan overseen by Dr. Charles Mcmahon, who identified an anomaly on the surface of the patient’s heart using the Insight-C10, developed by Medical Solutions. Additional details of the machine are attached in Appendix B. The anomaly was identified as only a micrometer in diameter, by default passed off as an error by the computer itself. However, Dr. Mcmahon decided to pursue further into the matter, gaining Mr. Gwan’s permission to conduct an open-surgery analysis.

The anomaly turned out to be true and physical, identified as A1 in this report. A1 is a small, smooth, circular disk barely 1 micrometer in diameter and roughly 0.1 micrometers thin. Visibly, it is also black and metallic. Astonishingly, A1’s atomic structure is highly complex, made of carbon, silicon, iron and a range of super-heavy elements that were previously only found present in labs. A1’s function is currently unknown, other than that it attached to the surface of the patient’s heart.

Patient Mr. Gwan reported no physical or mental ailments that couldn’t be described by the normal side effects of space travel, including nausea, claustrophobia, and bone marrow loss. Subjecting lab grown human tissue to A1 also yielded no additional effects beyond physical interaction between the cells and the metallic disk.

After the successful removal of A1 from the patient’s heart, medical records of those aboard Bradwell’s Dawn were obtained, which expanded to anyone who participated in FTL travel in the past six months. 20% of the sample size included full body scans using the Insight-C10 or similarly up-to-date machines. Of those, a further 15% returned positive anomaly identifications on the surface of the heart, all of which were passed off as errors. The presence of A1 cannot be found in medical records of those who haven’t participated in FTL travel. These figures indicate a curious side effect of FTL travel on the human body that was previously undetectable.

Without any apparent negative effects on the human body, physicians are advised to inform their patients of the presence of A1 on their hearts, but also to advise against surgical removal such that long term effects can be studied. For now, the growth of A1 on the human heart as a result of FTL travel is dubbed cardiolithiasis, or Heart stone disease.
 

Ray of Meep

Administrator
Wiki Moderator
Report 23121103

Luna Institute of Technology
Cardiology Branch of the Medical Division

Dr. Ken Jackson


Over the past two years, additional resources have been committed to further understand cardiolithiasis, or Heart stone disease, by tailoring scanning technology to a heart stone's composition, and by expanding the sample size. On February 17th, 2312, the first heart stone sample in the human bloodstream was discovered, using the modified Insight-C10-Micro, its specifications attached in Appendix A.

Ursula Richards is a Slavic-American female, age 54, able-bodied, a hydroagricultural engineer returning from Atlantica after a ten year employment. The details of her travel are attached in Appendix B. Like previous heart stone disease patients, a small heart stone disk was found on the surface of her heart, left ventricle to be specific. The modified Insight-C10-micro was used to analyze her blood sample, but reports initially returned negative. After gaining the patient's permission, Dr. Charles McMahon collected blood samples from specific regions of the body instead. The sampling technique is described in Appendix C. Two samples returned positive: blood near the heart and blood supplying the central nervous system.

Since Ms. Ursula Richard's positive blood test, the sampling has been expanded to all American Union civilians who participate in routine health inspections after FTL travel. 16% of blood samples report positive instances of heart stone after using up-to-date instruments.

Heart stone content in these positive samples is extremely low: 5 ppb. How the material is able to remain in localized areas in the body without spreading elsewhere is still a mystery, on top of heart stone's formation in the first place. After sharing the results with other departments in the Institute, some have linked heart stones to the spacetime warping characteristics of Wofleonium. It has been posited that Heart stone also requires a high energy, carbon-organic base to form, namely the human brain.

Thus far, negative effects of heart stone disease have yet to be realized. Thus, previous recommendations on treating the disease remain. Should patients have any concerns, mild off-the-shelf anti-oxidants and anti-cancer drugs can be prescribed.
 
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